Beyond Salsa Piano is a history and anthology of the role of the piano in the Cuban rhythm section – from its first appearance to the present. In a broader sense, it’s a study of the tumbao – the art of creating music from layers of repeating rhythmic and melodic phrases. Whether these syncopated figures are called tumbaos, guajeos, montunos, riffs or vamps, this Afro-Cuban concept lies at the heart of nearly every popular music genre from salsa to rock , funk, R&B, hiphop and jazz.

While presented as a set of method books, the series doubles as a history course and record collecting guide for listeners, dancers, and players of instruments other than the piano.

Perhaps the most important goal of the series is to provide a comprehensive understanding of how tumbaos are constructed, their central role in the texture of Latin music of all eras, and the endless possibilities they provide for creative composing and arranging.
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Tito y su Son de Cuba

Artist:   Heriberto "Tito" González

Style Released Album Tracks Charts
Son 2005 10 0
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$10.99

© 2005 Heriberto Gonzalez. All rights reserved.
Audio album download includes album tracks, liner notes, lyric sheets and cover art.
All audio tracks in MP3-VBR format. About LPM album downloads.
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# Name Play Time Info
01  Con Tito y su Son 3:53 una introducción: llegó Tito y su Son de Cuba
02  Busco A Alguien Que Me Quiera 3:38 estoy soltero mi hermano, y no tengo compromiso
03  Si Tu Supieras 2:01 bonito bolero sentimental y romántico
04  Rita La Caimana 5:01 tendrá la caimana dientes largos? no dicen
05  Corazon de Chivo 5:25 a mi padre oi cantar el primer son oriental
06  Mulata Rumbera 3:23 mora quien viene por ahi...una mulata salsera
07  Si Me Tocan El Tres 5:51 porque mi intrumento es la base de mi existir
08  Tocame El Bajo Livan 4:41 tun.tun -- tun.tun.tun -- tun.tun -- tunnnn.tun.tu.tun
09  No Quiero Llanto 4:56 entierrenme con un sombrero por si cae un aguacero
10  Quiero Dejar de Fumar 4:45 lo digo de corazón, ya estoy perdiendo el pulmón
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Debut release from Heriberto "Tito" Gonzalez, "El Trecero Mayor". Tito arrived in the San Francisco Bay area in the summer of 2000. His music is typical and primarily "El Son", the music you know from the Buena Vista Social Club.



"Tito" plays a Cuban instrument similar to the guitar, called the "Tres". He studied with Tres master Papi Oviedo of the Buena Vista Social Club and then with the greatest guitarist in Cuba, Octavio Sanchez Cotán.

He has played with such famous Cuban groups as Conjunto Estrellas de Chocolate, Aribu Quartet and Chapotin y sus estrellas, all from Havana, Cuba.

Before leaving Havana, "Tito" founded and played with the Nuevo Conjunto de Arsenio Rodriguez, a group carefully structured to represent the music of the famous Cuban tresero Arsenio Rodriguez. This group was assembled by Arsenio's daugther, Regla Rodriguez Travieso. She thought long and hard as to who should represent and play her father's music. She chose Heriberto "Tito" Gonzalez, a great honor.

"Tito" is playing with several groups in the San Francisco Bay Area, as well as accepting private students to teach the incredible Cuban Tres. He has also participated in community funtions at the Mission Cultural Center, in San Francisco and La Peña, in Berkeley.


Latin Beat Magazine, September, 2005

One of the highlights of this year's San Francisco Fillmore Festival took place on Saturday July 19 with Tito y su Son de Cuba. Kicking down authentic son montuno Heriberto "Tito" Gonzalez turned it out! Now based in Richmond, California, Tito is a seasoned singer and veteran tres guitarist. Along with his band, which celebrated two years together, have a self-titled debut album featuring original material. Rooted in the old-school Cuban styles of Reve and Rumbavana, the band blasted off with five horns leading the charge. They involved the audience by pulling girls up to the stage to dance and getting everybody clapping and singing. Highlights of his two hour-long sets included 'Si Tu Supieras', a nice bolero that featured the trumpet of Miguel Govea. Tito has a raw grainy voice seasoned by rum and cigars that, coupled with his expressive playful nature make listening to his improvised verses a delight. "Soy soltero y no tengo com- promiso," he sang out, and used it as a theme about finding the perfect mate, Mulata Rumbera was my favorite tune. --from an excerpt by Jesse Varela posted on Tito's website